Batkid to the rescue: Child's wish comes true

Batkid to the rescue: Child's wish comes true

Batkid to the rescue: Child's wish comes true

SAN FRANCISCO -- The Giants have seen their share of batboys. Friday was different, with "Batkid's" dramatic appearance.

Batkid, aka 5-year-old Miles Scott, performed a series of daring feats throughout the city, fulfilling his desire to be a superhero. The Giants became involved in Batkid's saga as he dashed into their ballpark to rescue Lou Seal, the club's mascot, from the dastardly clutches of the Penguin.

Miles, a victim of leukemia whose disease is in remission, was abetted by the Make-A-Wish Foundation and numerous San Francisco officials who paved Batkid's path of valor.

The youngster from Tulelake in Siskiyou County, near the Oregon border, became a celebrity as thousands celebrated his spirit and spunk. He was accompanied by, of course, Batman, who was portrayed by local acrobat Eric Johnston. Seemingly the entire nation went on Twitter to express fondness and admiration for Batkid, including President Barack Obama and many professional sports teams, such as the Arizona Diamondbacks and Colorado Rockies, two of the Giants' National League West rivals.

Batkid's excellent adventure began in mid-morning as he rescued a woman -- Johnston's wife, Sue -- tied to cable car tracks. After preventing a bank robbery by the Riddler, followers at Union Square informed Batkid that Lou Seal was in trouble.

Batkid and Batman sped in the Batmobile to AT&T Park, where they swooped in on the slide at the left-field pavilion. Finding Lou Seal bound and helpless on the miniature baseball field in the Coca-Cola Fan Lot, Batkid performed yet another rescue. He received a heartfelt hug from Lou. San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr, in his guise as Commissioner Gordon, appeared on the scoreboard's video screen to congratulate Batkid for his bravery. A fireboat in McCovey Cove shot its water cannons, as if the Giants had just won a postseason game.

Then it was time for a break and a little baseball. Batkid politely asked if he could run the bases. Receiving permission, off he went. Giants president Larry Baer gave Batkid a bag loaded with Giants souvenirs.

Throngs of Batkid's fans were lined up outside the ballpark, hoping to catch a glimpse of their hero, as he left for a triumphant rally at City Hall to accept the key to [Gotham] city.

"It was like the World Series," said Staci Slaughter, Giants senior vice president of communications.

Chris Haft is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Haft-Baked Ideas, and follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.