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Proctor vying for a spot in Giants' bullpen

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SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- Scott Proctor admitted that he should have handled his recovery from Tommy John surgery in a different manner.

Proctor, 36, ranked among the top setup relievers in the Major Leagues in 2006-07, making 83 appearances each season for the Yankees and, in the second half of '07, the Dodgers. But arm problems and the eventual surgery in May 2009, have forced him to take a circuitous route to try to return to the Majors. Since the start of '08, he has compiled a 6.59 ERA in 86 outings for the Dodgers and Braves, made 60 appearances in the Minors and spent 2012 pitching professionally in Korea.

"I'm stubborn and impatient and I know more than trainers. Apparently that's what I thought, which I found wasn't true," Proctor said Tuesday. "They kept telling me 14-16 months [recovery time], and I kept telling them two to three. I tried to meet them in the middle, and it didn't work out."

Formerly known as a power pitcher, Proctor was asked if he regained his velocity in Korea.

"Velocity's second to me," he said. "The biggest thing is executing pitches consistently."

The Giants have one job opening in their bullpen -- two if an incumbent reliever falters or if they begin the season with 13 pitchers -- and Proctor is a legitimate candidate for that spot. However, he faces competition from fellow Major League veterans Chad Gaudin and Ramon Ramirez, among others.

"It's out of my control. That doesn't even enter the equation. My thing is coming in here and doing my job," Proctor said. "They make the decisions. That's not what I'm paid to do."

{"event":["spring_training" ] }
{"event":["spring_training" ] }
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