Panda departs with tight left quad muscle

Panda departs with tight left quad muscle

SAN FRANCISCO -- Giants third baseman Pablo Sandoval left Sunday's 3-1 win over the Indians after the sixth inning due to a tight left quad muscle, but he didn't expect it to keep him from playing at least one of San Francisco's two games Tuesday in Chicago.

Sandoval lined a double to center field -- his first extra-base hit since returning from a fractured hamate bone on June 14 -- to lead off the fifth. He moved to third when Aubrey Huff grounded out to second base, but he came up noticeably limping.

He manned third base in the sixth inning but was replaced the following frame by Miguel Tejada.

Giants manager Bruce Bochy said the decision to pull Sandoval was strictly a case of being extra cautious, and he could have kept playing, if necessary.

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"I'm going to be good," Sandoval said. "I don't want to go on the DL again. I just want to make sure I can be ready for Tuesday."

Bochy said he didn't know for sure if Sandoval would be ready to play in both parts of the Giants' doubleheader against the Cubs, but by avoiding aggravating the injury Sunday night and having Monday off, Sandoval should be good to go for at least one of the games.

The Giants have already suffered a number of injuries this season -- including Sandoval, who was out for more than a month -- and don't feature a great deal of infield depth. Utility man Mike Fontenot is set to begin another rehab assignment on Monday, while third baseman Mark DeRosa has been out since May 18 with a strained ECU tendon in his wrist.

Sandoval was at his locker after Jeremy Affeldt closed out Sunday's victory, excited about the Giants' sweep of the Indians and about his first multi-hit game since April 26. And he was particularly giddy about his double, smiling widely before his one-word reply about how it felt to record his first extra-base hit in two months.

"Happy," he said.

Adam Berry is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.